Posts Tagged ‘Joe Klein’

Glenn Beck off the Deep End

Sunday, March 6th, 2011

It seems like Glenn Beck may have finally gone too far.

The week that the Egypt protests broke wide open, Beck seemed to go off the deep end with his talk of how the peaceful protests in Egypt demanding the end of Mubarak’s rule could be a precursor to the eventual establishment of an Islamic Caliphate that would take over the entire Middle East and potentially spread into Asia and Europe.

If you didn’t know that Beck was a pasty faced huckster with no real sense of international politics or history, then you might get really freaked out watching him manipulate his touchscreen to create a phosphorescent Islamic Caliphate out of the entire Middle East and then explain how Spain, France, Britain and Italy could come under the sway of the new Caliphate because they also have some Muslims living in their countries. Beck goes on to weave a complex tapestry of conspiracy, which includes among its members both President Bushes, “the Left,” and labor unions, just to name a few. In fact,  throughout the week Beck tied the Islamic caliphate theory to quite an impressive list of Fox News villans, including Islamic Socialists, ACORN, Code Pink, Anarchists and Bill Ayers, all of whom Beck claimed were engaged in a  ”well orchestrated campaign” to pave the way for the caliphate.

The next week, Bill Kristol at the American Standard, the most idealistic (Pollyanish?) of the neo-cons, called Beck out. Kristol contrasted Charles Krauthammer’s words of caution about events in Egypt and Beck’s paraniod ravings, noting:

hysteria is not a sign of health. When Glenn Beck rants about the caliphate taking over the Middle East from Morocco to the Philippines, and lists (invents?) the connections between caliphate-promoters and the American left, he brings to mind no one so much as Robert Welch and the John Birch Society. He’s marginalizing himself, just as his predecessors did back in the early 1960s.

In fact, as Chris Matthews pointed out, Beck’s paraniod ramblings seems to be cribbed directly from the John Birchers‘ recent talking points.

In the month that has followed, a number of prominent conservatives have joined Kristol in denouncing Beck. Joe Scarborough (no fan of Glenn Beck before) called him ”bad for the conservative movement” and said that he was “losing it before our eyes.” Peter Wehner, from the uber-conservative website Commentary, called him the “most disturbing personality on cable television,” and urged conservatives to distance themselves from him before he “blows apart professionally.” Time columnist Joe Klein noted that he had heard from more than a few conservative sources that “prominent conservatives” have approached Rupert Murdoch and Roger Ailes and pushed for his ouster at Fox.

While Fox has never been a network particularly concerned with the truth, perhaps a better motivator may be Beck’s declining ratings: January’s ratings were the worst he’s posted since his Fox show debuted in January 2009.

My own take on this is that two trends are driving this backlash against Beck and people like him:

First, the country has had a full two years of heart rending bitter partisanship. While Obama and Pelosi were running the country and the Right was fully mobilized against them, there was a strong tendency toward cohesion. The nutty conspiracy theories that Beck was spouting were tolerated because they were aimed at a common enemy. Now that the inexorable march toward liberal “tyranny” has been stopped, people are looking for a respite from the continual pitched battles between left and right. This has shown up not only in Beck’s declining ratings, but in public opinion about Sarah Palin after she clumsily and agressively went on the attack after Gabby Giffords was shot. At a time when the country needed healing, Sarah Palin showed the same pettiness that she has shown throughout her career, and the public took note. While Obama delivered a stirring speech on the need to come together as Americans and tone down the rhetoric, Palin once again seemed obsessed with her own public image and sense of victimhood.

In a similar vein, the Republican victory is revealing cracks in the facade of conservative unity that were obscured during the fight against a common enemy. These cracks were conspicuously on display during the Egyptian protests.  Neo-cons who still believe in Bush’s “freedom agenda” have a far different worldview from the cautious realpolitik that Repulicans like Kissinger and Brent Scowcroft used so effectively (and that Obama’s team has tried to emulate), and Glenn Beck’s Bircher influenced conspiracy theories are almost diametrically opposed to the neo-con worldview. As events unfolded in Egypt, you had people like Beck and others basically arguing that Muslims can’t be allowed to have democracy and neo-cons like Kristol arguing that Middle Eastern democracy is essential to achieving our national security objectives.   

While no faction has a monopoly on truth, Beck’s recent rantings are undeniably nutty and it is clear that it’s probably in the interest of the Republicans to distance themselves from him. As Kristol alluded to, we may finally be seeing a replay of the early 1960′s when William F. Buckley famously denounced the John Birch Society in the National Review.

The secretive Birch Society had views that were not far from Beck’s. It’s founder, Robert Welch had called President Dwight D. Eisenhower, ”a conscious, dedicated agent of the communist conspiracy” and he claimed that the US government was “under operational control of the Communist party” (can’t you hear Beck saying something like this on his show?).  

In his 1962 editorial, Buckley called Welch “idiotic” and “paranoid” and said his views were “far removed from common sense.” This effectively banished the Birchers from the conservative movement for almost 50 years, until  they re-emerged in 2010.

Could we be watching history repeat itself 5o years later? I won’t hold my breath, but this might be fun to watch. 

What the Hell Happened to John McCain?

Friday, January 7th, 2011

Two years after his historic loss to Barack Obama, it is worth asking: “What the hell happened to John McCain?” 

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McCain was one of my favorite Republicans back in the day (it’s a very short list), but in the past two years (and especially in the past one year), he has become unrecognizable.

The process started with the 2008 campaign, when he started kissing the asses of Jerry Falwell and the Christian Right after he had called them “agents of intolerance” in the 2000 Republican nomination campaign against George W. Bush. It continued as he embraced the Bush tax cuts in 2008 after campaigning in 2000 on a program that wasn’t much different than Al Gore’s “lockbox” and then voting against the tax cuts in the Senate in 2001.

But even through the 2008 election, he stuck to his guns on issues that he had bucked his party on, including Cap and Trade, Immigration Reform, the Border Fence, Campaign Finance, the DREAM Act and at least keeping an open mind on the repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell. On each one of those core issues, he has since reversed his position or stopped actively advocating for the policy.

Inevitably, these 180 degree reversals have invited parodies and armchair psychological theories on what is going on with this guy. Most of those analyses start with the fact that, as Richard Wolfe noted on Hardball, losing a presidential election “messes with your head.” Jacob Weisburg laid the situation out well (although quite melodramatically) during the 2010 primaries in an article which posited that a badly run campaign and the choice of Sarah Palin weighed heavily on McCain’s conscience. After McCain ended the year bitterly leading the charge against the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell Repeal, the DREAM Act and the START Treaty in the Lame Duck Session of the Senate, Time Magazine’s Joe Klein hammered McCain, writing: 

His public fall has been spectacular, a consequence of politics…and personal pique. He’s a bitter man now, who can barely tolerate the fact that he lost to Barack Obama. But he lost for an obvious reason: his campaign proved him to be puerile and feckless, a politician who panicked when the heat was on during the financial collapse, a trigger-happy gambler who chose an incompetent for his vice president. He has made quite a show ever since of demonstrating his petulance and lack of grace.

Jon Stewart’s piece (posted above) on how John McCain’s continual moving of the goalposts on on Don’t Ask Don’t Tell will forever put him on the wrong side of history is particularly devastating. Stewart (another former admirer of McCain) started this year lampooning McCain as a cranky old man who had become, “less as a paragon of straight talk independence… and more of an object lesson in just how f-ing mad people get when they don’t get their way.”

Of course, I can’t resist adding my own theory to all of this psychobabble:

It’s been a rough few years for McCain. His frustration that America chose the inexperienced Barack Obama over him was painfully visible throughout the campaign (think of the debate where he referred to Obama as “That One“). To top it off, McCain lost ugly, picking the inexperienced Sarah Palin after his advisers told him that, if he picked Lieberman, he would lose the election by fracturing the Republican base (not to mention creating the cranky old man/whiney old man ticket). Then, soon after this gut wrenching defeat, he faced a primary where he felt the only way to keep his job was to run as far to the right as possible, effectively going back on many of the things he had stood for throughout his career.

While this 180 degree change might have been easy for a politician like Mitt Romney, McCain has always had a strong sense of honor. My PhD in armchair psychoanalysis leads me to believe that the only way that McCain could cope with this was to internalize this new set of values and (as he has done so many other times in his life) embrace the new identity wholeheartedly. Add to this the anger at losing to Obama and McCain’s consistent tendency to rebel against any authority and you have a perfect storm to make the transition from Maverick to dogmatic cultural conservative.

Tragically, McCain’s transformation comes at a terrible time for the country. In this time of crisis, more than ever, we need rational centrists that can look past the narrow political interests of party and work together to find common sense solutions to our problems.

Put more succinctly, we need Mavericks.

Does anyone know where we can find one?